Don’t Miss Financial Lessons from the 24th of July Holiday

24 July 2017 Written by   Published in Peaks Financial Fitness

I stayed up late Saturday night writing this post, and I heard the fireworks that were going off around the neighborhood. Those sounds reminded me about the 24th of July holiday, and I thought about our holiday memories. We often go to the rodeo and the parade in Ogden. This is the first time that my husband will have this holiday off work. Because it is a holiday that celebrates the pioneers settling Utah, and it isn’t celebrated in other states, my husband usually had to work. His past employer’s customers were out of state, but his current employer has given them the holiday off work.

So, I usually celebrate the 24th without my husband. One year, my kids and I planned to celebrate it by watching my brother run the Deseret News Marathon and then watch the 24th of July parade in Salt Lake. It was about an hour drive from my home. Ten minutes into our ride on the I-15, the rear passenger tire on my van blew out. A kind Utah Highway Patrolman came by and changed my tire for me. That tire blowout completely changed our plans that holiday. Instead of making it to the race’s finish line, we went to Discount Tire to purchase a new tire and then out to brunch. As I watched my kids eat their kids meals, I thought about how much our plans had changed for that day. Plans guide and direct us but sometimes circumstances are out of our control.

Don’t give up when plans change

Budgeting is making financial plans. We set out to do certain things with our money, but a lot of unseen circumstances change our plans. Budgeting is a constant struggle for me, which is why I blog about it. Blogging keeps me accountable to keep budgeting — even when the plan completely changes. Financial flat tires include getting sick, losing a job, illness, etc. This summer we’ve had a lot of changes to our financial plans. One of my sons has struggled to learn to read and do math, and I felt tutoring would be helpful. Our starter went out on our car. We thought the problem was fixed, but on Thursday night, the car wouldn’t start for my husband, and he called me to come and rescue them. Although we can't predict these things, we can adjust our plans to work with them. My family has relied on our emergency fund to help us get through these changes in plans. We haven’t given up on the budget, but we also have not stressed about the financial detours.

Learn from the detours and change

We can learn from these detours and change so that we are better prepared for the future. As the patrolman was changing the van's tire, I was thinking about how I could have prepared better. I could learn more about car maintenance, check the fuel pressure more often, pay closer attention to how the car drives and check my tires when I suspect a flat — especially when I'm in a hurry. Recently my Toyota Sequoia showed a warning light, which I didn’t recognize. I googled it and found out that it was a tire pressure warning. That surprised me because I had just had the tires rotated. It was inconvenient for me to have the tire pressure checked because I was taking a group of youth to Salt Lake that day, but I had learned from the experience a few years prior. I am grateful to that warning light. I went to Big O Tires, and it only took a few minutes for my tires to be checked. The technician said that the tires’ pressure was all over the place. I asked him questions to learn about why that happens. He explained that the change in weather could have done that. He was so kind, helpful, and fast. I was very grateful that I had taken a few minutes to do that so that we could have a safe ride.

Keep practicing and following the plan

When circumstances are out of control, we don't have to throw away the plan, but we will have to make adjustments and allowances for emergencies and other unforeseen events. The more we budget, the better we get at it, and the more we learn. As we celebrate the journey that the pioneers made, we can keep on our journey. They had so many obstacles and changes to their plans. They had sickness, deaths in their families, broken wagons and handcarts. There are many similarities between their journeys and our journeys. We can keep going like they did. We can keep stepping forward in our financial journeys.

How do you celebrate the pioneers on the 24th of July? What have you learned from them?

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