Important Lessons I Learned from Going Back to School

07 August 2017 Written by   Published in Peaks Financial Fitness

Our family has started shopping for school supplies, and it was a little crazy with four kids helping me. School supplies and fees can cost hundreds of dollars, especially for teenagers. So, for this post, I planned on writing about budgeting for school expenses, but then I realized that I had written a post about that last year, which you can read here. Since I didn’t want to write that same post, I felt stuck with writer’s block.

A few weeks ago, my sister and I drove past our Elementary and Junior High schools on the way to visit our Grandma. It seems so long ago that we were headed back to school at those two buildings. Shortly after that drive, I received a Facebook invitation for my 20th High School Reunion.

As I headed back to high school for our alumni reunion, a lot of thoughts came flooding in. Some were regrets. Some were memories of my best friends and what we did. Since it was the first reunion I have attended, I didn’t know what to expect. Except for being hot, it was great. I visited with classmates way past the time the reunion was supposed to end. I learned a lot from going back to school!

Lessons Learned from Going Back to High School

Heraclitus said, “Change is the only constant in life."

In 20 years, a lot of things have changed in our lives. People have come into our lives: spouses, kids, in-laws, friends, neighbors, etc.. People have gone out of our lives: some of our classmates have passed away and our energetic principal Earl Heninger passed away over five years ago. Many of us have had family members pass away. Some have married. Some have divorced, Some have experienced severe health challenges. Some earned degrees. There have been job changes, relocations, and changes in hairstyles.

Every change in our life affects our finances. Budgets that don’t allow for change won’t work because change is inevitable. We can all plan on having changes to our plans, and that’s okay. As high school students, we were prepared for life, but we didn’t know exactly what life would bring us. We had to become flexible enough to handle change. Flexibility in your finances allows you to learn from a mistake instead of giving up on your financial plan and budget. Flexibility this month allowed for that $10 library fine. Flexible budgeting allowed me to buy new fish after ours died. Many events in life are unpredictable. Once we accept that, we can decide on how to respond financially.

Teachers can be our mentors.

Teachers have been so important in my schooling. I think they are the most important part of school. I wish they could have been at the reunion. I’m sure they have a lot of stories about our class of ‘97. My history teacher was so excited about history that it made me love European history too. I wish I had told her that. A good teacher makes so much of a difference! My art teacher loved art so much that I enjoyed it even though I wasn’t an artist. I had one teacher that didn’t care about us. We were his last class, and he really just cared about retiring. I didn’t learn much from him. He was gone as much as he possibly could be gone without getting fired.

Everyone you meet can teach you something.

Teachers are not just the paid professionals who stand in front of the class. Everyone we meet can teach us. Coaches, parents, friends, and neighbors are all teachers. Our peers can also teach us. Every classmate had a story of when they had to be strong and courageous. Our mascot was a warrior. Each of these classmates have had to be a warrior in some aspect of their lives. I loved seeing this part of my classmates. They are inspiring me to keep facing and overcoming challenges. I wish that in high school I hadn’t categorized anyone, but instead had seen what I could learn from each one of them, and what I could teach each of them. I wish I could see the courage and strength that they were developing to use when life’s storms hit them.

This applies to our finances too. It’s so important to have a good financial mentor because they inspire you to manage your money well — even if you don’t like to manage money. My grandpa was a good mentor to me. He taught me to work, give, save, and invest. Friends, neighbors, and family have been mentors to me. Many of them have taught me some simple things like save every raise that they received, pay off debt, and invest. Financially, we gain courage and strength by doing the little and simple things like tracking and gauging budget accounts. Finances have ups and downs. I would personally love to have a steady climb of income that always goes up, but these mentors have taught me that finances and life are more like roller coasters — they have a lot of ups and downs. These mentors have taught me to do the simple things in our finances in order to handle the ups and downs.

Much of our learning isn’t formal education.

Every experience teaches us something and can help us. I discussed feeling regrets as I thought back to my school days, but I decided that as long as I learn from those experiences, I never have to regret an experience. Now that we’ve all been adults a for a while, life has taught us a lot.

Much of our financial learning comes through life lessons. We learn about finances by living our life. We learn from trying and making mistakes. As long as we learn, we don’t have to feel regrets. We can take those financial lessons and help teach them to others.

The most important thing about going back to school isn’t buying the school supplies or learning the most facts. It’s about learning from everyone you meet. It’s about becoming strong enough and flexible enough to handle whatever life brings. It’s about learning to adapt to changes. It’s about learning from every experience you go through. We can apply all these lessons to our finances. What are some lessons you have learned since graduating from high school?

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